Week 7 Reflection – Newfound Perspective on Learning Theories

Over the past several weeks, my understanding of learning theories has broadened significantly. By discovering the intricacies and context of these ideas, I was able to understand the dialogue between differing viewpoints in a constantly changing framework that these theories inhabit. I found it interesting to see the traces of some of the pillars of learning theories adopted in newer schools of thought that adapt to our shiny new media landscape.

One of the factors that stood out to me in relation to how I personally learn is the emerging technologies that fuel certain newer learning theories, such as Adult Learning. I recalled the slow learning shift to online classrooms that I experienced in my early twenties during my undergraduate classes. It seemed like a nearly seamless change at the time, but it was enlightening to read about the biological background behind how my preferred method of learning evolved.

This course has reinforced the influence that technology has on how (and how often) I learn. It made me more aware of and allowed me to visualize the complex system in which I attain information. My goal is to be more discerning about the sources and to strive towards maintaining a diverse web of knowledge, as it can be tempting to remain stagnant and accustomed to my own perspective. In discussing the technological function in regards to the Adult Learning theory, Merriam indicated that “Globalization and communications technology have resulted in adult educators in the West becoming more aware of diverse worldviews and epistemologies regarding learning and knowing” (Merriam, pg. 96, 2008). I found this larger idea, that pertains to far more than the confines of this particular learning theory, to be uplifting and powerful. Embracing this mentality will allow me to be a better student, in addition to designer of instructional and learning content.

Resources:

Merriam, S. B. (2008). Adult learning theory for the twenty-first century. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 119, 93–98.

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