Week 8 Reflection – EDUC 6115

EDUC 6115 was an enriching experience that significantly broadened my perspective on the different intersecting ways that people learn. I was surprised to see how many different learning theories, styles and strategies resonated with me personally or reminded me of previous interactions with peers about how they learn. This illustrates the complicated and often overlapping ideas about how we learn, why we learn and, finally, how we can shape this process – either through means of our own educational journey or as that architect of instructional materials.

This course deepened my comprehension of my personal learning process insofar as I will now be cognizant of how I learn and what steps I can take to be a more efficient learner. As technology and its influx of readily available information steadily become a prominent factor in all types of learning. Creating the web diagram of the different sources of knowledge that I am constantly immersed in was a productive exercise in understanding the full scope of this reality.

I will recall upon these ideas for the rest of my life, not just limited to the rest of my educational institution endeavors. One of the biggest concepts that has been revelatory to me over these several weeks is the idea of how to approach learning in a classroom consisting of students with diverse learning backgrounds without excluding anybody. Kapp explains that “what we need is to take the best from each philosophy and use it wisely to create solid educational experiences for our learners” (Kapp, 2007). Though, the turning point in my comprehension of this quandary was Glenn’s argument that “Glenn argues that “teachers should worry about matching their instruction to the content they are teaching” (Glenn, 2009). Exploring this mentality, in addition to all the other fascinating ideas from his colleagues, will allow me to create effective learning content and will help immensely in my upcoming path towards the instructional design field.

 

Resources:

Glenn, D. (2009, December 15). Matching Teaching Style to Learning Style May Not Help Students. Retrieved April 11, 2017, from http://www.chronicle.com/article/MatchingTeachingStyleto/49497/

Kapp, K. (2007, January 02). Out and About: Discussion on Educational Schools of Thought [Web log post]. Retrieved March 20, 2017, from http://karlkapp.com/out-and-about-discussion-on-educational

Week 7 Reflection – Newfound Perspective on Learning Theories

Over the past several weeks, my understanding of learning theories has broadened significantly. By discovering the intricacies and context of these ideas, I was able to understand the dialogue between differing viewpoints in a constantly changing framework that these theories inhabit. I found it interesting to see the traces of some of the pillars of learning theories adopted in newer schools of thought that adapt to our shiny new media landscape.

One of the factors that stood out to me in relation to how I personally learn is the emerging technologies that fuel certain newer learning theories, such as Adult Learning. I recalled the slow learning shift to online classrooms that I experienced in my early twenties during my undergraduate classes. It seemed like a nearly seamless change at the time, but it was enlightening to read about the biological background behind how my preferred method of learning evolved.

This course has reinforced the influence that technology has on how (and how often) I learn. It made me more aware of and allowed me to visualize the complex system in which I attain information. My goal is to be more discerning about the sources and to strive towards maintaining a diverse web of knowledge, as it can be tempting to remain stagnant and accustomed to my own perspective. In discussing the technological function in regards to the Adult Learning theory, Merriam indicated that “Globalization and communications technology have resulted in adult educators in the West becoming more aware of diverse worldviews and epistemologies regarding learning and knowing” (Merriam, pg. 96, 2008). I found this larger idea, that pertains to far more than the confines of this particular learning theory, to be uplifting and powerful. Embracing this mentality will allow me to be a better student, in addition to designer of instructional and learning content.

Resources:

Merriam, S. B. (2008). Adult learning theory for the twenty-first century. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, 119, 93–98.

Mindmap Reflection

I found it to be beneficial and enlightening to map out the various ways in which I learn. I became mindful of how learning can seem to be a constant flow in our lives, especially in an age where one can be inundated with stimuli. As I was creating this diagram, I started to weigh the substance of each source and how beneficial each might be. I realized that much knowledge is certainly situational, but I became increasingly interested in how these types of information overlap and intersect with each other. I will now be more cognizant of the relationship these connections have or do not have with each other. This will allow me to think more critically about how I learn and establish effective strategies and anticipate resistance to change.

The digital tools that best facilitate learning for me, in broader terms, are the ever-prevalent online social forums of interaction, namely Reddit. I find myself absorbing an enormous amount of knowledge from this particular source. I feel that much information from the online sector of my mindmap end up spreading to many of the other sections.

I think my knowledge acquisition largely depends on the environment or context I am in, though the online category is omnipresent throughout. It is interesting to think how our instincts towards asking questions has been so drastically impacted by technology and its ability to immerse us in a world of constantly available information.

My personal learning mindmap aligns with connectivism, as it illustrates the constant interactions between different learning connections and emphasizes the necessary need to discern between such an influx of knowledge. George Siemens explains that “connectivism is driven by the understanding that decisions are based on rapidly altering foundations” (Siemens, 2004). This exercise was a compelling snapshot of our current learning climate. I would be curious to map out learning connections from previous stages in my life and identify the possible advantages or disadvantages that a simpler mindmap might contain.

Sources:

Siemens, G. (2004). Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the Digital Age. [online]. Retrieved April 8, 2017 from http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/connectivism.htm